Music Artist

Fiona Apple

Fiona Apple

Music Artist, Rock : April 30th, 2013

Fiona Apple McAfee Maggart (born September 13, 1977) is an American singer-songwriter and pianist. Her debut album, Tidal, was released in 1996 and received a Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance for the single “Criminal”. Subsequent albums include: When the Pawn… (1999), Extraordinary Machine (2005), and The Idler Wheel… (2012).
Apple’s vocal range is contralto.[1][2] Her musical style contains elements of jazz and alternative rock. Born in New York City, Apple is the daughter of singer Diane McAfee and actor Brandon Maggart.[3] Her maternal grandparents were dancer, Millicent Green and big band vocalist Johnny McAfee. Her sister sings cabaret under the stage name Maude Maggart and actor Garett Maggart is her half brother.
Apple was introduced to the music industry in 1994, when she gave a demo tape containing the songs “Never Is a Promise”, “Not One of Those Times”, and “He Takes a Taxi” to her friend who was the babysitter of music publicist Kathryn Schenker.[4] Schenker then passed the tape along to Sony Music executive Andy Slater.[5] Apple’s contralto voice, piano skills and lyrics captured his attention, and Slater signed her to a record deal.[1][2]
In 1996, Apple’s debut album, Tidal, was released by Work Records and Columbia Records. The album sold 2.7 million copies and was certified three times platinum in the U.S.[6][7] “Criminal”, the third single, became a hit and the song reached the top forty on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. The song’s controversial Mark Romanek–directed music video—in which a scantily clad Apple appeared in a 1970s-era tract house—played on MTV. Apple later said: “I decided if I was going to be exploited, then I would do the exploiting myself.”[8] Other singles from Tidal included “Shadowboxer”, “Sleep to Dream”, and “Never Is a Promise”. In 1997, while accepting MTV Video Music Award for “Best New Artist” for her song Sleep to Dream, Apple said: “This world is bullshit, and you shouldn’t model your life on what we think is cool, and what we’re wearing and what we’re saying.”[9] The New Yorker and NYRock characterized her MTV award show speech as ungrateful and “ridiculous”.[1][4] Apple was unapologetic. “I just had something on my mind and I just said it. And that’s really the foreshadowing of my entire career and my entire life. When I have something to say, I’ll say it,” she said, responding to these criticisms in an article in Rolling Stone in January 1998.[10]
During this period, Apple also made recordings of The Beatles’ “Across the Universe” and Percy Mayfield’s “Please Send Me Someone to Love” for the soundtrack of the film Pleasantville. She later canceled the last twenty-one dates on a tour in support of her album due to “personal family problems”.[11]
[edit]1999–2002: When the Pawn… and hiatus
Apple’s second album, When the Pawn…, was released in 1999. Its full title is a poem Apple wrote after reading letters that appeared in Spin regarding an article that had cast her in a negative light in an earlier issue.[12] The title’s length earned it a spot in the Guinness Book of Records for 2001. However, as of October 2007, it no longer has the longest album title, as Soulwax released Most of the Remixes, a remix album whose title surpasses When the Pawn’s length by 100 characters.[13] When the Pawn was cultivated during Apple’s relationship with film director Paul Thomas Anderson. When the Pawn, which was produced by Jon Brion, used more expressive lyrics, experimented more with drum loops, and incorporated both the Chamberlin and drummer Matt Chamberlain.[14] The album received a positive reception from publications such as The New York Times and Rolling Stone. It did not fare as well commercially as her debut, though it was an RIAA-certified platinum album[6] and sold one million copies in the U.S.[7] The album’s lead single, “Fast as You Can”, reached the top twenty on Billboard’s Modern Rock Tracks chart and became Apple’s first Top 40 hit in the UK. The videos for two follow-up singles, “Paper Bag” and “Limp” (directed by then-boyfriend Anderson), received very little play.
After performing for forty minutes in a set hampered by equipment issues to 3,000 audience members at the New York City Roseland Ballroom, a frustrated Apple left the stage without returning. Her performance saw Apple appearing distraught at the sound quality, apologizing numerous times for the sound and crying.[15] The incident was described by AOL as “music’s most infamous on-stage meltdown”.[16] After completing a concert tour in support of her second album in 2000, Apple relocated to Los Angeles. During her hiatus, Apple contemplated retiring from her recording career. Apple sang with Johnny Cash on a cover of Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge over Troubled Water” that ended up on his album American IV: The Man Comes Around and was nominated for a Grammy Award for “Best Country Collaboration with Vocals”. She also collaborated with Cash on Cat Stevens’s “Father and Son”, which was included in his 2003 collection Unearthed.

PORTFOLIO

[portfolio_slideshow]

MUSIC

Every single night

Shadowboxer

criminal

www.fiona-apple.com/
www.facebook.com/fionaapple

www.youtube.com/fionaapple

VIDEOS



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